Pearl Powder Charts

Here is the picture I ran across one day that made me fall in love with Mica Powders and how they look on hot glass. After seeing this picture, I just had to give it a try myself.
 
 

All beads were made on a HotHead with Effetre 204 White, 004 Clear, or 064 Black
dipped in the powder, flashed in the flame, and repeated once. These beads are small spacer beads.

For comparison purposes, here are a couple of pictures of everything together and one with my hand for size reference.


Click on each picture below for a better look.

Pearl-Ex Powders

 # Color On the Beads Powder Notes
--- --------- ---- No powder - for comparison purposes.
640 Carbon Black  
641 Pumpkin Orange  Not worth the effort.
642 Salmon Pink   Not worth the effort.
643 Pink Gold Ok if you're looking for a pale gold coverage, but if you're looking for pink, you won't get it.
644 Reflex Violet   Not worth the effort.
645 Grey Lavender  
646 Mink This color packs too much to get a solid coverage.
647 Sky Blue Difficult to get coverage from this color. Not really worth it.
650 MicroPearl Numbers 650-652 are all pearl powders and each one increases the amount of pearl effect you get. This one really doesn't give much of a pearl effect.
651 Pearl White This gives a medium pearl effect.
652 MacroPearl Gives the beads a very strong pearlescent sheen. The powder looks like it has tiny flakes of silver in it.
653 Red Russet  
654 Super Russet  
655 Super Copper  
656 Brilliant Gold   Not worth the effort.
657 Sparkle Gold Larger particles than most of the other colors. Really makes the beads sparkle.
658 Aztec Gold  
659 Antique Gold If you want a mottled pink, this color on white does it.
660 Antique Bronze  
661 Antique Copper  
662 Antique Silver This one give you a less mottled, but paler pink than the antique gold.
663 Silver  
664 Super Bronze  
665 Sunset Gold  
670 Interference Red  
671 Interference Blue
672  Interference Green The black bead I made with this powder kept breaking - took me 4 tries to get a black bead that didn't break.
673 Interference Violet  
674 Interference Gold  
680 Duo Red-Blue Difficult to get coverage from this color. If you do get coverage, you'll get a slight blue from it. Not really worth it.
681 Duo Blue-Green Difficult to get coverage from this color. If you do get coverage, you'll get a slight green from it. Not really worth it.
682 Duo Green-Yellow Difficult to get coverage from this color. If you do get coverage, you'll get a slight gold from it. Not really worth it.
683 Bright Yellow What you see on the bead is actually gray ash. Not worth the effort.
684 Flamingo Pink What you see on the bead is actually gray ash. Not worth the effort.
685 Spring Green If you're looking for a Shrek color, this powder on white will do it for you.
686 Turquoise  Not worth the effort.
687 True Blue Difficult to get coverage from this color. If you do get coverage, you'll get a slight blue from it. Not really worth it.
688 Misty Lavender  Not worth the effort.
689 Blue-Russet  
690 Sparkling Copper Larger particles than most of the other colors. Really makes the beads sparkle.

 


 

Pixie Dust Powders

Color On the Beads Powder Notes
--------- ---- No powder - for comparison purposes.
Sparkle Bronze This color packs too much to get a solid coverage.
Sparkle Copper  
Sparkle Dark Bronze This color packs too much to get a solid coverage.
Sparkle Gold  
Sparkle White  
Sparkle Dark Gold  
Sparkle Fruit Punch  
Sparkle Red  
Sparkle Silver  
Sparkle Light Green  
Sparkle Teal  
Hi-light Blue  
Hi-light Gold  
Hi-light Green  
Hi-light Red  
Hi-light Violet  

 


 

Wilton Pearl Dust

Wilton now has an edible pearl powder in a variety of colors. What you see on the bead is not anything pearly looking - the powder sort of fizzled into a metallic looking mess. After testing this out on a bead, I will NOT be using this. Yuck!

Bronze
Gold
Leaf Green
Lilac Purple
Orchid Pink
Ruby Red
Sapphire Blue
Silver
White
Yellow

 


Sundance Art Glass uses pictures from our website on their website with permission.


Comparison of the 2 Brands

Before I began working with the Pixie Dust, I thought it was just re-labeled Pearl-Ex because the colors were so similar. I've since changed my mind. The Pixie Dust powders are not as "fluffy" as the Pearl-Ex powders. This means that they tend to pack a bit more and this distorts the beads just a bit when rolling in the powder. You can see the results in the charts. I worked both sets of powders the same, but the Pixie Dust powder beads are just a bit more misshaped. All of the Pixie Dust colors worked though, and I can't say the same about the Pearl-Ex colors.  


Important Safety Notice!

You should know that if the mica particles are flying around in the are in a high concentration (such as when you shake a bottle of powder and then open it) they can burst into flame as soon as they come into contact with melted glass. I keep mine in a glass bottle so that if this happens, all I need to do is remove the mandrel and the flame goes out. Others either keep a soaking wet paper towel nearby or use foil shaped into a cup and just squish the cup to put the flame out. This can be quite startling if you're not expecting it, but if you know about it before hand and have a plan, you can use these powders safely. Of course, the easiest way to prevent this is to not shake or stir the powders before use.


Purchasing

I don't sell these powders. Your local craft store (Michaels, Hobby Lobby, AC Moore) may carry some of the Pearl-Ex colors. Check a local Art Store to see if they carry all of them. The last time I purchased some, I got them from Dick Blick. If you want to get the Pixie Dust Powders, many online lampworking merchants sell them. Just a few are Frantz, and Arrow Springs. Devardi sells some also, but I've not tested any of theirs.


Not all Pearl Powders are made the same.

Components used, as well as manufacturing methods can affect whether an individual powder will work well for lampworked beads. One of the biggest problems is that the color just burns off leaving something that looks a little bit like gray ash. I even have some colored mica flakes I got to encase in beads, but all 9 of the colors just burn off leaving me with just a plain looking piece of mica - but at least it looks interesting when encased. I have tried some of my eye cosmetics, but didn't have much luck with them. The color would turn to ash each time. I guess the next 2 items I would want to try are the pearl powders they sell in the stacking pots in the kiosks in the malls (maybe these), or some of the pearls for use in the automotive painting industry. Here is one company that keeps sending me emails.


Have fun and let me know what works for you!

 

2004-2016 Kay Powell

 


You can contact Kitty by emailing her at kay@listen-up.org.

 

2002-2015 - Kay R Powell. All rights reserved.